Posted by: henrymcghie | September 3, 2012

Sounds of nature

Hello- I had an email in response to this blog. The sender agreed to me posting the comment here

“Incidentally, I discovered the blog of “Nature Manchester”, and I got captivated by the idea of the relationships between culture and nature that you were mentioning somewhere. Typically, we conserve more visual documentation: mainly books, writings, or so many examples in art – practically, we could say that all the styles are inspired by nature.

But what about music?! what about sounds? So much music incorporating the sounds of birds, the sound of whales, the sound of the sea or the wind (especially contemporary music). I understand that in museums is more difficult to catch the attention with sounds, but the cultural relation between music and nature, specifically birds, is unlimited. Music produced by humans (instrumental or vocal) is a constant imitation of nature: the tempo of the sea, birds, insects, the hypnotic silence of hummingbirds. Even the most sophisticated, radical or avant-garde music has its origin in nature: a yearning for freedom, or longing for a flying bird. Our own sounds through poetry! we have a tempo for every emotion transmited through our words. What about folk music?! The music of people, also primal sounds shared with nature (this is clear in the colourful folk music of México, Central América, South Amarica, or Africa! the sound of the desert). Irish, Scottish and English folk music has also a direct relationship with nature, there is always a tale involving some animal, forest or fairy. Cultures that are more expressive in feelings have more connections with nature. The list is never-ending.

It would be so great to incorporate in those exhibitions of animals music produced by humans as a bridge between the visitor, the animal (in whatever form) and the space itself.

I could not resist to share it with you while I was thinking about the influence of wild, untamed animals in our culture and ways of living.”

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